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Table of Content

    15 July 1955, Volume 21 Issue 3 Previous Issue    Next Issue
    ON THE CONTENTS AND THE METHODS OF STUDY OF PLANT ECOLOGY AND GEOBOTANY
    HOU HSIOH-YU
    1955, 21 (3):  213-243.  doi: 10.11821/xb195503001
    Abstract ( )   PDF (1835KB) ( )   Save
    Plant ecology is devoted to the study of individual species of plants in relation to climate, soil anal other living things, or in other words, to iwvestigate the relationship of the morphology, structure, chemical character and physiological processes of individual spacies of plants with their environmental conditions. Geobotany with the study of plant communities as the chief object of its con-tents is an inseparable part of plant ecology. Its development is, therefore, decided, to a considerable extent, by plant ecology's achievements. As to its contents, the author is of the opinion that it should include not only the natural plant com-munities but also the artificial plant covers. Both plant ecology and geobotany are now in the infantile stage in China. They are in need of detailed and sufficient materials at weir disposal, and therefore field work should be promoted with great efforts at present. Furthermore, however, indoor research work is to be strengthened step by step and the work at fixed stations shall be commenced at certain places properly chosen only on the basis of field work in associaton with discovered problems.
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    THE CLIMATIC TYPES OF FLOODS AND DROUGHTS IN THE VALLEYS OF THE YANGTZE AND THE HUAI RIVERS
    C. LEE AND M. W. WAN
    1955, 21 (3):  245-258.  doi: 10.11821/xb195503002
    Abstract ( )   PDF (859KB) ( )   Save
    On the basis of the past climatic records in China, World Weather Records and various climatic data published in Japan, this paper in an analysis deals with the flood and drought types in the valleys of the Yangtze and the Huai Rivers from the standpoint of climatic conditions. Four comparatively outstanding types have been discovered in the valleys, viz. flood and drought types, each of which is divided into two kinds.
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    THE VALLEY FORM OF THE UPPER HAN RIVER, FROM PAI-HO TO TAN-CHIANG-KOU
    CHU CHEN-TA
    1955, 21 (3):  259-271.  doi: 10.11821/xb195503003
    Abstract ( )   PDF (958KB) ( )   Save
    The Han river above Tan-chiang-kou flows in a W-E direction, cutting obli-quely the NW-trending strata composed mainly of Sinian schists and limestones and tertiary red beds. The alternation of resistant and soft rocks allows the development of basin and gorge in this stretch of the valley, so that it may narrow at places to about 100 m and broaden at others 18 times as wide. The gradient, varying from 0.13呱to 0.48呱,is interrupted by rapids of all sorts. Favourable sites for reservoirs are numerous.
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    DISTRIBUTION OF CUNNINCHAMIA LANCEOLATA
    WU CHUNG-LWEN
    1955, 21 (3):  273-285.  doi: 10.11821/xb195503004
    Abstract ( )   PDF (781KB) ( )   Save
    1. Orcrtrtingha}nia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook. is endemic to China, being one of the most important timber trees. It is extensively planted in hilly or moun-tainous areas of Central,East, South China and in the eastern part of the South west. Its northern limit follows the southern slopes of the Tsingling Ranges (along the 880 m. contour); whereas its southern limit reaches the northern part of the Leichow Peninsula, Kwangtung Province. In the west, it appears among the river gorges of the Tatu, the Arming and the Yalung Rivers, bordering the Tibetan-Sikang Plateau. On the east, it extends off the coast as far as the mountains of Taiwan. 2. The range of Cunninghamia lanceolata coincides approximately with that of evergreen broad-leaved trees in South China. Nevertheless, it is not common that it, being not tolerant, is mixed with the evergreen hardwoods. On the other hand, Crmtningharrtia lanceolata stands are frequently found side by side with the evergreen hardwood stands.
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    THE PROBLEM OF THE SOURRCE OF THE YELLOW RIVER
    Whang Sheng Chang
    1955, 21 (3):  287-305.  doi: 10.11821/xb195503005
    Abstract ( )   PDF (1438KB) ( )   Save
    The present paper consists of three parts: 1. Chapter One solves mainly two problems: (A) "Yo Gu Tsung Lieh Ch'(river)”as the principal source of the Yellow River investigated in 1952 was first discovered in 1717. The source of the Yellow River which was drawn in "The Complete Atlas of the Imperial Territory" and described in Ch'i Shao Nan's "The Outlines of the Water Canals" was no other than the same mentioned above and that known by Mongolian terms as Soloma, or Altar Gol, was also the same as the one Albert Tafel inves-tigated in 1707.
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