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Table of Content

    15 January 1956, Volume 22 Issue 1 Previous Issue    Next Issue
    HUMAN GEOGRAPHY SERVES IMPERIALISM
    Chang Tung-chu
    1956, 22 (1):  1-36.  doi: 10.11821/xb195601001
    Abstract ( )   PDF (2604KB) ( )   Save
    Human geography is ono of the ideological weapons of imperialism in the modern capitalist world. It has for its research subjects nature and human life, or in other words, geographical environment and social development. The basic thought content of human geography is the vulgar geographical determinism, with idealistic and metaphysical viewpoints as the basis of its methodology.
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    THE VEGETATION TYPES OF CHINA
    S.S.Chien, C.Y.Wu and C.T.Chen
    1956, 22 (1):  37-92.  doi: 10.11821/xb195601002
    Abstract ( )   PDF (4268KB) ( )   Save
    China has a very vast area, complex environment and rich plant species comprising arctic, temperato and tropical types. In addition to climatic, edaphic and topographical differences in different geographical regione, the vegetation-ty-pes havo been made more complicated by certain geological factors, the glacial factor, for instance, which resulted in remaining certain amount of preglacial remnants in certain places. The anthrohic effects for more than 5,000 years have certainly caused profound changes in our natural vegetation. In general, the en- vironmental factors which affect the vegetation most are climatic, topographic, edaphic, histbric and biotic onus among which the climate is certainly the most important, but in connection wiili other features its effect is expressed differently in different regions. In China, in western part, especially in Tibetan plateau, the topographical factor becomes most prominent; in northern and eastern parts the cold tide predominates,in the coastal region the Pacific and Indian monsoons play the leading part.
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    ON TENTATIVE SCHEME FOR DIVIDING ZOOGEOGRAPHICAL REGIONS OF CHINA
    Cheng Tso-hsin & Chang Yung-tsu
    1956, 22 (1):  93-109.  doi: 10.11821/xb195601003
    Abstract ( )   PDF (877KB) ( )   Save
    Based on a study of the geographical distribution of mammals and birds, the present paper devises a tentative scheme for dividing the zoogeographical regions of China. According to tile scheme, the country may be divided into seven regions: Northeast, Mongo-Sinkiang, Tibet, North China, Central China, Southwest, and South China with the first four regions belonging to the Palae-arctic Realm and the last three to the Oriental Realm. The boundary between these two realms in China appears to be along the Himalayas in the west and the Tsinling Range in the east, with an intermingling of Palaearctic and Ori-ental forms in the coastal region east of the Tsinling and also along the me- riclional mcnmtain ranges of the Southwest region.
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    FURTHER DISCUSSION OF THE MAIN SOURCE OF THE YELLOW RIVER
    Hwang Sheng-chang
    1956, 22 (1):  111-119.  doi: 10.11821/xb195601004
    Abstract ( )   PDF (582KB) ( )   Save
    The present article reveals the mistake Mr. Li Yuan-hsing(李元星) made in his article "The Earliest Date Traceable of the Main Source of the Yellow River". Mr. Li based his article on the map drawn by Yang Tze Ch'i(杨子器) of the Ming Dynasty. On that map, one can find below the Starry Sea(星宿海)two riveilets which Mr. Li ratiocinated to be the Yo Ku Tsung Lieh Chu (river)(约古宗列渠)—the main source of the Yellow River and its branches. Iie further inferred that the Yo Ku Tsung Lieh Chn was found, as oarly as the T'ang and Yuan Dynasties, to be the main source of the Yellow River.
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