Acta Geographica Sinica ›› 2007, Vol. 62 ›› Issue (5): 501-509.doi: 10.11821/xb200705006

Previous Articles     Next Articles

Seasonal Air Temper ature Variations Retr ieved from a Geladaindong Ice Core, Tibetan Plateau

ZHANG Yongjun1,2, KANG Shichang1,3, QIN Dahe3, REN Jiawen3, ZHANG Yulan1,2, Bjorn GRIGHOLM4, Paul MAYEWSKI4   

  1. 1. Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, CAS, Beijing 100085, China;
    2. Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China;
    3. Key Laboratory of Cryosphere and Environment, CAREEI, CAS, Lanzhou 730000, China;
    4. Climate Change Institute, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469, USA
  • Received:2006-09-12 Revised:2007-04-05 Online:2007-05-25 Published:2007-05-25
  • Supported by:

    National Natural Science Foundation of China, No.40401054; National 973 Program of China, No.2005CB422004; CAS Hundred Talents Program; Knowledge Innovation Program of CAS, No.KZCX3-SW-339/334

Abstract:

A 70-year history of precipitation δ18O record has been retrieved using an ice core drilled from a plat portion of the firn area in the Guoqu Glacier (33o34'37.8"N, 91o10'35.3"E, 5720 m a.s.l.) on Mt. Geladaindong (the source region of the Yangtze River) during October and November, 2005. Based on the seasonality of δ18O records and the significant positive relationships between monsoon/non-monsoon δ18O values and summer/spring air temperature from the nearby meteorological stations, the history of summer and spring air temperature have been reconstructed for the last 70 years. The results show that both summer and spring air temperature variations present similar trends during the last 70 years. Regression analysis indicates that the slope of the temperature - δ18O relationship is 1.3 oC/‰ for non-monsoon δ18O values and spring air temperature, and 0.4 oC/‰ for monsoon δ18O values and summer air temperature. Variation of air temperature recorded in the ice core is consistent with that in the Northern Hemisphere (NH), however, the warming trend in the Geladaindong region is more intense than that in the NH, reflecting a higher sensitivity to global warming in the high elevation regions. In addition, warming trend is greater in spring than in summer.

Key words: ice core +18O, summer, spring, air temperature variations, Mt. Geladaindong, Tibetan Plateau