Acta Geographica Sinica ›› 2006, Vol. 61 ›› Issue (1): 77-88.doi: 10.11821/xb200601008

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A Review on Complex Erosion by Wind and Water Research

SONG Yang, LIU Lianyou, YAN Ping   

  1. College of Resources Science and Technology; Key Laboratory of Environmental Change and Natural Disaster, the Ministry of Education of China, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China
  • Received:2005-09-22 Revised:2005-10-26 Online:2006-01-25 Published:2006-01-25
  • Supported by:

    National Natural Science Foundation of China, No.40541005; No.30371191; The Ministry of Education of China, No.272008

Abstract:

Complex erosion by wind and water, which is also called aeolian-fluvial interactions, is an important erosion process and landscape in arid and semiarid regions. The effectiveness of links between the wind and water process, spatial environmental transitions and temporal environmental change are the three main driving forces determining the geomorphologic significance of aeolian-fluvial interactions. As a complex interrelating and intercoupling system, complex erosion by wind and water has spatial-temporal variation features. The process of complex erosion by wind and water can be divided into palaeoenvironmental process and contemporary process. Early work in drylands has often been attributed to one of two schools advocating either an "aeolianist" or a "fluvialist" perspective, so it was not until the 1930s that the research on complex erosion by wind and water has been conducted. There are several obstacles restricting the research of complex erosion by wind and water. Firstly, how to transform in different temporal and spatial scales is still unsettled; and secondly, the research methodology is still immature. In the future, the mechanism and control of erosion, the complex soil erodibility in wind and water erosion will be the emphasis of research on complex erosion by wind and water.

Key words: complex erosion by wind and water, aeolian-fluvial interactions, semiarid regions, sediment, contemporary process